The Séviac villa : a luxurious residence (Montréal-du-Gers, Gers)

A palatial country residence of Novempopulanie

Séviac is located twelve kilometres from Elusa (Eauze), main town of the civitas, which was elevated to the rank of capital of the province of Novempopulanie in the late 3rd century CE. Coming in the wake of a number of researchers, the most recent efforts by Jean Gugole and Brieuc Fages have revealed the history of this prestigious Gallo-Roman site. It was occupied starting in the Augustan era, and acquired its monumental size in the early 2nd century. The layout was somewhat loosely organised, with a peristyled residence of 950 sq. metres, and a 250 sq. m. bathing establishment to the south. To the east of the residence and baths was a funeral monument built along a road. A warehouse completed the ensemble.

In the third quarter of the 4th century, an ambitious reconstruction project brought the residence and baths together in a ensemble with a surface area of nearly 6,000 sq. metres. It was built around a peristyled courtyard measuring some thirty metres on a side. In the first half of the 5th century, a new owner emphasised the villa's more public side and fitted it with new plant-patterned mosaics. The ostentation reached its height in a reception room opening onto the vestibule. It had a "basilical" layout covering 240 sq. metres, and it was even heated. Towards 500 CE, a room to the southwest was turned into a baptistery, in connection with a church and a cemetery. The aristocratic occupation continued, in a smaller villa with disused baths, until the end of the 6th century. In the 7th century, a peasant community took over the site, which was given a new church. The ostentation and social aspects of the baths

Right from the start, the baths were an element of the villa. They were refurbished and expanded several times, all the way down to the 5th century, testifying to the place that baths held in the lives of the villa's owners.

The first baths were located in a separate building, 15 metres on a side. The symmetrical layout perhaps indicates separate bathing areas for men and women. The surface area was doubled with the addition of a second bathing sector. The new structure, which was used up until the mid-4th century, was richly decorated with a profusion of Pyrenean marble.

The luxurious residence of the 5th century was fitted with extraordinarily large baths, which extended across some 500 square metres. Starting from the secondary courtyard that connected the baths to the living areas, one entered into a vast frigidarium that was enlivened by reflections from a semicircular pool richly ornamented with mosaics. The pattern was that of polychromed scales surrounded by plaited cables. To the left of this entry area, guests would then pass into a large, lightly-heated room, the tepidarium, and from there into the hot room, the caldarium, with three apses, whose architecture could not fail to impress them. Except on great occasions, the members of the familia used a small space to the right of the frigidarium, where there was a cloakroom that gave onto the latrines, and more comfortable baths that were easier to heat.
Interactive document - Aerial view of the Séviac Villa today, Montréal-du-Gers

Aerial view of the Séviac Villa today, Montréal-du-Gers

The site was excavated for thirty years, between 1967 and 1997, under the leadership of Paulette Aragon-Launet. Aerial photo of the villa with modern-day developments.
© Fabien Colléoni
Interactive document - General layout of the Séviac Villa

General layout of the Séviac Villa


© M. Cabarrou - architecte DPLG
Interactive document - Layout of the baths in the Séviac Villa

Layout of the baths in the Séviac Villa

Phase 1: layout of the villa's original baths under the Early Roman Empire. It is symmetrical, and the positioning of the rooms reflects the standard bather's progression from the cold area to the hot rooms. Layout of the baths, second phase from the 4th century CE. The new ensemble is organised around a large central room, the frigidarium, which is flanked by hot rooms.
© Alain Bouet
Interactive document - The peristyled courtyard and an ornamental pool

The peristyled courtyard and an ornamental pool

In the foreground an ornamental pool, located in the large peristyled courtyard, and in the background the entrance to the villa.
© Fabien Colléoni
Interactive document - Detail of a mosaic from a 5th-century CE public room (west wing)

Detail of a mosaic from a 5th-century CE public room (west wing)

Detail of one of the medallions depicting a basket filled with fruit.
© Fabien Colléoni
Interactive document - Detail of a mosaic from a 5th-century CE public room (west wing)

Detail of a mosaic from a 5th-century CE public room (west wing)

Detail of one of the medallions depicting a vine branch and grape clusters.
© Fabien Colléoni
Interactive document - Mosaic with oblique square pattern from the western portico

Mosaic with oblique square pattern from the western portico

Repetitive geometric composition that is characteristic for passageway mosaics.
© Fabien Colléoni
Interactive document - Mosaic from the southern exterior gallery

Mosaic from the southern exterior gallery


© Fabien Colléoni
Interactive document - Mosaic with fruit trees, 5th century

Mosaic with fruit trees, 5th century

Mosaic with fruit trees from the public room.
© Fabien Colléoni
Interactive document - An early Christian worship site?

An early Christian worship site?

Tank constructed in the double-apsed room, thought to be a baptistry.
© Fabien Colléoni
Interactive document - Sixth-century church

Sixth-century church

Structure with a single nave and a rectangular chevet, associated with a cemetery.
© Fabien Colléoni
Interactive document - Bathing necessities

Bathing necessities

Bathing necessities: strigils, clothing pegs and an aryballos. Of various origins (MAN87085 unknown, MAN1110 Eure, MAN71898 Paris, MAN19526.a Suèvres).
Musée d'archéologie nationale © Photo RMN- Thierry Le Mage
Interactive document - Construction of a new protective structure for the bathing sector of the villa

Construction of a new protective structure for the bathing sector of the villa


© Sylvie Bach
Interactive document - Pilaster capital with vine wreath decoration

Pilaster capital with vine wreath decoration

This element is reminiscent of the decorative repertory of 5th-century mosaics.
© Fabien Colléoni

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